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Thread: lionfish

  1. Default Lionfish stringer

    I'm building a new stringer so if I see and spear lion fish I won't get "spined" while taking it back to the boat and to the bbQ .
    Its a modification of my stringer that I gave away at the Christmas Party ,a bowfishing arrow that I put a loop of line through the hole in the arrow near the noch (the back of the arrow that would go on the bow string ) thats where I've been attaching a clip so that fish can't just swim off the back of the stringer when I'm not holding it .(If you use say 30lb test line it still leaves enough clearance room so that when I bring my Hawaiian sling handle I can shoot the arrow as a free shaft then after the first fish I put the clip on to retain the fish)
    The NEW STRINGER will have the hawaiian sling handle on the arrow with the clip attached to the loop so the loinfish cannot slide all the way up the arrow and maybe spine my left hand the slinghandle will keep all fish on the arrow at least 6 inch from the back end and I can hold the handle to carry it .
    To all of you who may not know what a hawaiian sling handle is, check out floridafreedivers.com. the handles are easy to make yourself too .and the bowfishing arrows are cheap if you have a shark take it away from you its not that big of a loss as when I used to use short polespears as stringers .this type of stringer saves alot of time when you shoot a fish with your speargun I just tilt the gun shaft up and tentstake the fish to the sand and then ram the arrowo or polespear through the eyes and tentstake the stringer to hold the fish while I replace the shaft in my gun and string it up and cock it .Also if you leave the fish tenstaked you can use it as a decoy to draw fish out from under a ledge while I lay on top waiting.try it out it works for me .

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    I live in Val-p, FL. My boat lives in Niceville & I dive off the coast of Destin.
    Posts
    4,841

    Default

    Below is a letter that I sent in response to the reply I received today to a letter I sent the FWC Commission in October. Read from the bottom up.

    From: Candy Hansard [mailto:candy@valp.net]
    Sent: Friday, January 14, 2011 11:32 PM
    To: Rich Abrams FWC; Louie Roberson FWC; Jon Dodrill; Horn, Bill FWC; Mille, Keith
    Subject: Please give me an update.

    Hi Rich,

    Thanks for answering the letter that I sent to the Commission 10 weeks ago.

    Looks like we’re going to have a lionfish explosion in the panhandle before anything gets done.

    The Commission wants to “Research the request” to remove the licensing requirement? How has that gone, now that it’s 6 weeks since the commission meeting?

    How many billions of lionfish eggs can be released by 1 mature fish in 6 weeks? How many will mature and breed while they “Research the request”?

    If all it takes is a "statutory language change" to allow removal of lionfish without a fishing license, why hasn’t the FWC gotten that done? No politician is going to block this change, if they did, they would be held responsible for the damage to Florida's $7 billion dollar per year fishery by the voters! In this political climate, that would be career suicide.

    Have Senator Don Gaetz & Senator Matt Gaetz been contacted about this issue? If so, what was their response to the request to change the language?

    Has Gov. Scott been contacted? He said he wanted to review agency regulations that are harming our state. This should be a perfect one for him to launch his agenda.

    I don’t think the Commissioners understand the seriousness of the threat. Our fishery is in BIG trouble!

    Please sound the alarm!
    Please save our fishery!

    Candy Hansard




    From: CitizensServices@MyFWC.com [mailto:CitizensServices@MyFWC.com]
    Sent: Friday, January 14, 2011 3:05 PM
    To: candy@ecreef.org
    Subject: Candy Hansard - Lionfish [Incident: 101101-000011]


    Thank you for contacting the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The response to your concerns appears below.

    You may follow the link below to login and check the status of your account.

    Thank you for allowing us to be of service to you.
    Subject
    Candy Hansard - Lionfish

    Discussion Thread
    Response (MF-RA) 01/14/2011 04:04 PM
    Dear Ms. Hansard:

    Thank you for your email to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Commissioners regarding license requirements for harvesting lionfish. We really value your input, and appreciate your concern for the protection of the state’s natural resources.

    Lionfish are an invasive species in Florida and the FWC, along with other agencies and organizations, is working to remove these fish from Florida waters. Currently, a saltwater fishing license is required to dispatch, harvest or remove these species from state waters. At the recent FWC Commission meeting (December 1-2, 2010), the Commissioners heard public testimony to remove the license requirement to dispatch, harvest or remove lionfish from state waters. The Commissioners directed FWC staff to research this request. License and fee issues are under the purview of the Florida Legislature. Our review of the current statute indicates that a statutory language change might be required to allow removal of lionfish without a fishing license. We are continuing to explore whether this can be done and how best to accomplish the task.

    In regard to licenses, Florida recreational saltwater license fees go directly into the Marine Resources Conservation Trust Fund and their use is specifically directed by statute. Funds are allocated to the FWC to be used as follows:
    ? Up to 7.5% may be used for administration of the licensing program and for information and education
    ? Not less than 30% is to be used for law enforcement
    ? Not less than 32.5% is to be used for marine research and management
    ? Not less than 30% is to be used for fishery enhancement, including fishery statistics, artificial reefs, and fish hatcheries

    Additionally, for every license sold in Florida, the Sport Fish Restoration Program (administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) provides additional funds to Florida which is used for a variety of fisheries programs including: to conduct many important fishery management programs, including fish population monitoring and research, development of artificial reef habitat, and outreach and education programs for anglers.

    As you can see, anyone who purchases a fishing license in Florida contributes in multiple ways to preserving the natural resources of the state and ensuring that these resources are available to everyone to use.

    On behalf of the FWC Commissioners, thank you for you and your organization’s interest in helping control lionfish and helping to preserve our native saltwater fish and habitat in Florida.

    Sincerely,



    Richard Abrams
    Environmental Administrator
    Customer (Sabrina Menendez) 11/01/2010 08:45 AM
    From: FWC Commissioners
    Sent: Monday, November 01, 2010 8:28 AM
    To: Menendez, Sabrina
    Subject: FW: Urgent Request for Action
    From: Candy Hansard [mailto:candy@valp.net]
    Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2010 3:08 PM
    To: FWC Commissioners
    Cc: nick.wiley@fwc.com; Robson, Mark; Roberson, Louie; Dodrill, Jon; Horn, Bill; Mille, Keith
    Subject: Urgent Request for Action

    [cid:image003.jpg@01CB7905.08BA1000]
    P.O. Box 273 Niceville, FL 32588 www.ecreef.org<http://www.ecreef.org>

    To: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissioners
    Subject: Lionfish Invasion and Fishing License Requirement Special Rule Request
    Last month, one of our members spotted a juvenile lionfish off the Coast of Okaloosa County. I knew this could mean big trouble for our fishery so I contacted Bill Horn in the Artificial Reef Department at the FWC and asked if he could come and talk to us about the lionfish.
    Bill Horn has provided our group with several presentations and classes over the years and his extensive knowledge and presentation skills have always been highly respected and appreciated by our organization. His presentation on the Lionfish was, without a doubt, the most important presentation ever presented to our Members.
    The threat the lionfish poses to our fishery is greater than I ever imagined and the urgency to address this problem on a local and State level is critical to keeping this species from decimating our native fish species.
    We have a large group of divers that do not fish, they call themselves Scubaholics. Because they dive only to observe the marine habitat, they do not have fishing licenses. These are very active divers and could be very helpful in our efforts to eradicate the lionfish. They have shown an interest in helping us to destroy lionfish to help save our fishery but they are not comfortable doing so because, the way the laws are currently written, these divers would be breaking the law.
    Because of the potential for devastating consequences if we do not enlist help from all divers to destroy the lionfish on sight, The Emerald Coast Reef Association is currently discussing creating a lionfish eradication education plan that we will want to pitch to dive shops. By enlisting the help of Divers all over the State in a year-round eradication effort, we may be able to save our fishery from unchecked predation.
    We need your help to accomplish our combined goal of eliminating the lionfish from our coast. Please consider enacting a special rule to exempt the capture/kill of the non-native lionfish from the licensing requirement. Exempting licensing requirements for the lionfish will enable thousands of divers to participate in an effort to save our fishery without fear of legal problems.
    Please consider this request and let me know your decision on this extremely important and time sensitive issue.
    Thank You for your time to consider this request. I will look forward to your response.
    Candy Hansard
    Emerald Coast Reef Association
    Reef Deployment Director
    candy@ecreef.org<mailto:candy@ecreef.org>
    www.ecreef.org<http://www.ecreef.org>

    ==================== image File Attachment ====================
    image003.jpg, 11357 bytes, added to incident
    Candy
    President, ECRA
    Reef Deployment Director

  3. Default

    Having divers go after lionfish is akin to having TSA take off your shoes before you get on an airplane. Everybody is happy because something is being done. When the water temp off shore gets below 55 degrees the lionfish will retreat to the deeper offshore waters in the gulf stream and when they are there it is too deep for divers so the whole time that the lionfish is in the gulf stream they are going to reproduce at staggering numbers.

    If you want to get rid of the lionfish, lets ban fishing for a couple of years that way there will be a over supply of hungry grouper, snapper and triggerfish that will be so hungry they'll eat anything...........to include the lionfish...........but we all know that will never happen.....just like we will never profile for terrorists getting on our airplanes and we'll just be happy that grandma got groped before she got on the airplane.

    Anyway if the "Scubaholics" want to help out great, have they pay their $7 for a license........jeez, it's only $7.

  4. #34

    Post

    Actually, the $7 license is for people fishing from the shore only. A full up license is required when fishing from a boat. I don't know for sure but I would imagine that applies to spear fishers from a boat as well. That license is about $18 / year now. Still, not a huge amount of money for a whole year.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    I live in Val-p, FL. My boat lives in Niceville & I dive off the coast of Destin.
    Posts
    4,841

    Default

    I don't think the Scubaholics should have to buy a fishing license to help save our fishery.

    It is the FWC's job to protect the fishery and enlisting the help of every person that is willing to help should not come at any cost to the volunteers.

    Given the seriousness of the threat from the Lionfish, I am shocked that the licensing rule wasn’t removed as soon as the first Lionfish was discovered in Florida’s waters!

    Studies are fine and dandy but action gets the job done. I encourage everyone to kill lionfish on sight.
    Candy
    President, ECRA
    Reef Deployment Director

  6. #36

    Default

    I have to agree, anyone that will "volunteer" to help save the fishery should be able to do it at no charge, diver or otherwise.


    So ---- where do I sign up?
    Capt. Frankie

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    I live in Val-p, FL. My boat lives in Niceville & I dive off the coast of Destin.
    Posts
    4,841

    Default

    As soon as the Monica Lee is deployed, I would like to begin an educational campaign to save our fishery from an invasion of the Lionfish.

    I'd like some volunteers to help with the campaign. Please reply here if you would like to be on the Lionfish committee.
    Candy
    President, ECRA
    Reef Deployment Director

  8. Default loinfish

    I'll help out .I've done a few google searchs on loinfish theres lots of info out there if you look .we can start a list of links for anyone wanting to learn more.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    I live in Val-p, FL. My boat lives in Niceville & I dive off the coast of Destin.
    Posts
    4,841

    Default FWC's Response to my last letter on the Lionfish issue

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Abrams, Rich [mailto:rich.abrams@MyFWC.com]
    Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 12:39 PM
    To: Candy Hansard
    Cc: Roberson, Louie; Dodrill, Jon; Horn, Bill; Mille, Keith
    Subject: RE: Please give me an update.

    Candy,

    The Commission has dedicated a group of staff involved in this issue to progress steadily and thoroughly forward with addressing the lionfish issue. This group has several items to consider (including the license requirements) in developing a strategic plan for FWC’s role in the control of the invasive lionfish. Marine fisheries staff (management and outreach), law enforcement, fisheries researchers, and invasive species staff are represented in the Lionfish Team and have been involved in the discussions to develop our agency plan. As in any issue, we are proceeding as rapidly as possible and considering all possible methods to address the problem. This process flourishes with stakeholder input and I appreciate both your conviction and feedback about the issue.

    While we are all concerned, it does not appear that licensing requirements are holding groups back from actively targeting the species. There have been several lionfish round-ups, rodeos and tournaments across south Florida with all participants supporting the cause and purchasing a saltwater fishing license. Anglers and divers across the state are removing lionfish from Florida waters, and various groups are taking part in the initiative to help control the species. The licenses they purchased support a variety of marine fisheries programs, including research and artificial reefs as well as the licensing requirement providing protection of all fish species from unauthorized harvest.

    While we know that there are groups that have obtained licenses in order to fish for this species, we are interested in knowing more. With your direct involvement in the diving community, do you know what groups do not have a license, but need it? Can they be covered on a charter license, for instance, a vessel that has a fishing license for all paying customers? Maybe they fulfill one of the exemptions that already exist for fishing licenses?

    As we move forward with this issue in a timely manner, FWC will continue to make sound decisions that consider all aspects of an issue (for the short term and the long term) and take into account the feedback from stakeholders, such as you and your group. Between the FWC Artificial Reef staff (Jon, Bill and Keith) and I, we will keep you apprised of the progress with the Lionfish Team.
    Rich
    Richard Abrams
    Environmental Administrator
    Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
    Division of Marine Fisheries Management
    Outreach and Education Subsection
    2590 Executive Center Circle, E. Suite 204
    Tallahassee, FL 32301
    Phone 850 488-6058
    Fax 850 488-7152
    ________________________________
    From: Candy Hansard [candy@valp.net]
    Sent: Saturday, January 15, 2011 12:31 AM
    To: Abrams, Rich; Roberson, Louie; Dodrill, Jon; Horn, Bill; Mille, Keith
    Subject: Please give me an update.

    Hi Rich,

    Thanks for answering the letter that I sent to the Commission 10 weeks ago.

    Looks like we’re going to have a lionfish explosion in the panhandle before anything gets done.

    The Commission wants to “Research the request” to remove the licensing requirement? How has that gone, now that it’s 6 weeks since the commission meeting?

    How many billions of lionfish eggs can be released by 1 mature fish in 6 weeks? How many will mature and breed while they “Research the request”?

    If all it takes is a "statutory language change" to allow removal of lionfish without a fishing license, why hasn’t the FWC gotten that done? No politician is going to block this change, if they did, they would be held responsible for the damage to Florida's $7 billion dollar per year fishery by the voters! In this political climate, that would be career suicide.

    Have Senator Don Gaetz & Senator Matt Gaetz been contacted about this issue? If so, what was their response to the request to change the language?

    Has Gov. Scott been contacted? He said he wanted to review agency regulations that are harming our state. This should be a perfect one for him to launch his agenda.

    I don’t think the Commissioners understand the seriousness of the threat. Our fishery is in BIG trouble!

    Please sound the alarm!
    Please save our fishery!

    Candy Hansard




    From: CitizensServices@MyFWC.com [mailto:CitizensServices@MyFWC.com]
    Sent: Friday, January 14, 2011 3:05 PM
    To: candy@ecreef.org
    Subject: Candy Hansard - Lionfish [Incident: 101101-000011]


    Thank you for contacting the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The response to your concerns appears below.

    You may follow the link below to login and check the status of your account.

    Thank you for allowing us to be of service to you.

    Subject

    Candy Hansard - Lionfish



    Discussion Thread

    Response (MF-RA)

    01/14/2011 04:04 PM

    Dear Ms. Hansard:

    Thank you for your email to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Commissioners regarding license requirements for harvesting lionfish. We really value your input, and appreciate your concern for the protection of the state’s natural resources.

    Lionfish are an invasive species in Florida and the FWC, along with other agencies and organizations, is working to remove these fish from Florida waters. Currently, a saltwater fishing license is required to dispatch, harvest or remove these species from state waters. At the recent FWC Commission meeting (December 1-2, 2010), the Commissioners heard public testimony to remove the license requirement to dispatch, harvest or remove lionfish from state waters. The Commissioners directed FWC staff to research this request. License and fee issues are under the purview of the Florida Legislature. Our review of the current statute indicates that a statutory language change might be required to allow removal of lionfish without a fishing license. We are continuing to explore whether this can be done and how best to accomplish the task.

    In regard to licenses, Florida recreational saltwater license fees go directly into the Marine Resources Conservation Trust Fund and their use is specifically directed by statute. Funds are allocated to the FWC to be used as follows:
    ? Up to 7.5% may be used for administration of the licensing program and for information and education
    ? Not less than 30% is to be used for law enforcement
    ? Not less than 32.5% is to be used for marine research and management
    ? Not less than 30% is to be used for fishery enhancement, including fishery statistics, artificial reefs, and fish hatcheries

    Additionally, for every license sold in Florida, the Sport Fish Restoration Program (administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) provides additional funds to Florida which is used for a variety of fisheries programs including: to conduct many important fishery management programs, including fish population monitoring and research, development of artificial reef habitat, and outreach and education programs for anglers.

    As you can see, anyone who purchases a fishing license in Florida contributes in multiple ways to preserving the natural resources of the state and ensuring that these resources are available to everyone to use.

    On behalf of the FWC Commissioners, thank you for you and your organization’s interest in helping control lionfish and helping to preserve our native saltwater fish and habitat in Florida.

    Sincerely,



    Richard Abrams
    Environmental Administrator

    Customer (Sabrina Menendez)

    11/01/2010 08:45 AM

    From: FWC Commissioners
    Sent: Monday, November 01, 2010 8:28 AM
    To: Menendez, Sabrina
    Subject: FW: Urgent Request for Action
    From: Candy Hansard [mailto:candy@valp.net<mailto:candy@valp.net>]
    Sent: Sunday, October 31, 2010 3:08 PM
    To: FWC Commissioners
    Cc: nick.wiley@fwc.com<mailto:nick.wiley@fwc.com>; Robson, Mark; Roberson, Louie; Dodrill, Jon; Horn, Bill; Mille, Keith
    Subject: Urgent Request for Action

    [cid:image003.jpg@01CB7905.08BA1000<mailto:image003 .jpg@01CB7905.08BA1000>]
    P.O. Box 273 Niceville, FL 32588 www.ecreef.org<http://www.ecreef.org>

    To: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissioners
    Subject: Lionfish Invasion and Fishing License Requirement Special Rule Request
    Last month, one of our members spotted a juvenile lionfish off the Coast of Okaloosa County. I knew this could mean big trouble for our fishery so I contacted Bill Horn in the Artificial Reef Department at the FWC and asked if he could come and talk to us about the lionfish.
    Bill Horn has provided our group with several presentations and classes over the years and his extensive knowledge and presentation skills have always been highly respected and appreciated by our organization. His presentation on the Lionfish was, without a doubt, the most important presentation ever presented to our Members.
    The threat the lionfish poses to our fishery is greater than I ever imagined and the urgency to address this problem on a local and State level is critical to keeping this species from decimating our native fish species.
    We have a large group of divers that do not fish, they call themselves Scubaholics. Because they dive only to observe the marine habitat, they do not have fishing licenses. These are very active divers and could be very helpful in our efforts to eradicate the lionfish. They have shown an interest in helping us to destroy lionfish to help save our fishery but they are not comfortable doing so because, the way the laws are currently written, these divers would be breaking the law.
    Because of the potential for devastating consequences if we do not enlist help from all divers to destroy the lionfish on sight, The Emerald Coast Reef Association is currently discussing creating a lionfish eradication education plan that we will want to pitch to dive shops. By enlisting the help of Divers all over the State in a year-round eradication effort, we may be able to save our fishery from unchecked predation.
    We need your help to accomplish our combined goal of eliminating the lionfish from our coast. Please consider enacting a special rule to exempt the capture/kill of the non-native lionfish from the licensing requirement. Exempting licensing requirements for the lionfish will enable thousands of divers to participate in an effort to save our fishery without fear of legal problems.
    Please consider this request and let me know your decision on this extremely important and time sensitive issue.
    Thank You for your time to consider this request. I will look forward to your response.
    Candy Hansard
    Emerald Coast Reef Association
    Reef Deployment Director
    candy@ecreef.org<mailto:candy@ecreef...ndy@ecreef.org>>
    www.ecreef.org<http://www.ecreef.org>

    ==================== image File Attachment ====================
    image003.jpg, 11357 bytes, added to incident



    [---001:005210:11778---]
    Candy
    President, ECRA
    Reef Deployment Director

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    I live in Val-p, FL. My boat lives in Niceville & I dive off the coast of Destin.
    Posts
    4,841

    Default My response to the FWC's letter posted below.

    From: Candy Hansard [mailto:candy@valp.net]
    Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 10:44 PM
    To: Rich Abrams FWC; Louie Roberson FWC; 'Dodrill, Jon'; 'Horn, Bill'; 'Mille, Keith'
    Subject: Lionfish

    Hi Rich,

    I have no doubts about the dedication of the FWC staff, it has been my great pleasure of working with several of them and, over the years, I have been impressed with their tremendous knowledge and commitment. My frustration is not at all leveled at the fine staff of the FWC but at the Commissioners’ failure to take swift and effective action.

    The leaders job is to lead and judging from the lionfish explosion in South Florida, I fear that Florida’s entire fishery is in grave danger. Ordering “studies of a request” that would cost nothing, but could help save our fishery gives the appearance that they do not understand the urgent need for immediate action.

    I appreciate your desire to have everyone buy a fishing license and I understand that the FWC needs the revenue but doesn't it feel just a little bit wrong to expect non-fishers to pay for a fishing license, to help save our fishery? Even the suggestion that non-fishers should “pay” to help manage the fishery seems like a PR nightmare just waiting to happen.

    At a time when the American people are screaming about out-of-control government and ridiculous regulations, it would seem prudent, as the agency responsible for protecting Florida’s fishery, to be in front of this issue and be the organization that quickly fixes their own regulatory problems.

    The biggest problem our fishery faces right now, may very well be the beautiful, voracious and prolific lionfish.

    Removing the licensing requirement would impress on everyone the seriousness of the threat. Not only that, it is a way the FWC could enlist a volunteer army to fight the invasion at NO COST to taxpayers or the FWC. Creating a cost-free solution to this very serious threat could make your agency look like hero’s in these tough economic times!

    South Florida is already experiencing an invasion that threatens the survival of their recreational and commercial fishery. If this trend continues unchecked, before we know it, the panhandle will have the same problem. Lionfish have already been spotted off our coast. We have no idea how bad the problem is…yet, but the fact they have been spotted here means we have a BIG problem. It could be a matter of just a few years before our fishery suffers tremendous and possibly irreparable harm.

    The health of our fishery doesn’t just impact fishermen, it impacts our tourism and our entire State Economy. Without the help of every diver, Florida may not have any chance to win this war.

    While I believe studies are important, action is needed right now, to save our fishery. Spending years moving forward, progressing steadily, and working on strategic plans while the lionfish population gets out of control is not acceptable. Remember, Lionfish:
    • Sexually mature at 1 year
    • Reproduce year round, about every 4 days
    • Mature female can release ~ 2 million eggs per year
    • Generalist carnivores can consume > 56 species of fish and invertebrates
    • Prey can exceed half the body length
    • Lionfish populations can consume > 2 pounds of prey / acre / day
    • Can reduce prey levels by 90%
    • Consume native fishes at unsustainable rates

    Something needs to be done…now!

    You mentioned that it may take legislative action to change the regulation. Has that determination been made yet? If it does take legislative action, what legislators have been contacted and what was their response to the FWC?

    Rich, I do appreciate you watching this situation and keeping me informed. I know you are limited in what you can do but if you have any power to persuade the Commissioners, please try to convince them to launch a State wide kill-the-lionfish campaign. Please contact the marketing department and try to persuade them make the cover of the next published regulations brochure and Fishing Lines showcase the Lionfish issue to encourage everyone to help in the effort to eradicate this species from our waters.

    I sincerely thank you for your service to our fishery,

    Candy Hansard
    Candy
    President, ECRA
    Reef Deployment Director

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